Procrastiblog

September 6, 2006

Laundering Money

Filed under: India — Chris @ 8:40 pm

For the benefit of future foreign MSRI employees and other Americans in possession of a Citibank Suvidha account:

1) It is possible to transfer your Rupees to a US bank, see below.
2) I have not been able to use my Citibank India ATM card in the US, but I haven’t actually tried very hard. It is not a PIN issue, as I can check my balance—it just won’t let me take out cash.

To transfer your money to the US, you need to:

a) Have your passport, visa, and pay slips that have been signed and sealed by the company. In my case, I brought every single pay slip and they were stamped and signed by HR.

a) Go to the Citibank Suvidha office in the Prestige Meridien building on MG Road. This is not the regular Citibank branch office out front, but a special office which is reached by walking around the building to the left, up a staircase, and past a Cafe Coffee Day. You will be asked to sign in. You need to talk to, IIRC, Shamila at the second desk on the left.

b) Fill out a form requesting “Remission for the Maintenence of Family”. Do not ask to close your account. This will cause a controversy. For the amount you will write something like “X Rupees in USD” to signify the conversion of your Rupee balance to US dollars. I believe there is a fee of Rs 1200 for the transfer.

c) Be careful when you sign the forms. The most commonly heard phrase in the Suvidha office is “signature mismatch”. (Do you actually know how to sign your own name? You’ll get to find out!)

D) Et voila. Your money will appear in your US bank account within a week.

[UPDATE 9/9/2006] ATM card works in U.S. Citibank ATMs. Has not worked as yet in non-Citibank ATMs.

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1 Comment

  1. Cool beans. You’ve saved me a trip to eHow.com! and my blog readers from some kind of rant. I’ll just return to writing about toilets now.

    Comment by cwei — September 7, 2006 @ 4:09 am


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